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Talks

Webinars

Below you may find a list of available webinar talks. Expand each of the individual boxes for more details and links to YouTube videos.

Non-Sequential Physical Optics

 

In this webinar, we show how to enable non-sequential tracing in VirtualLab and application use cases, which get large benefits from it.

Video on YouTube (33:18 min)
Use Case and sample files in VirtualLab Fusion (ZIP)

Seminars

Below you may find a list of available webinar talks. Expand each of the individual boxes for more details and links to YouTube videos.

Beyond Ray Tracing: Innovative Optical Simulations with Fast Physical Optics

Sunnyvale, 8 June 2018, Free VirtualLab Fusion Seminar
Hartwig Crailsheim

Talk (PDF)

Analysis and Design of Diffractive and Micro-optical Systems with VirtualLab Fusion Software

San Francisco, 2 February 2018, SPIE Photonics
Huiying Zhong

Talk (PDF)

LASYS 2018

Below you may find a list of conference talks. Expand each of the individual boxes for more details.

Tailored Laser Beam Shaping by Freeform and Diffractive Optics

Stuttgart, 6 June, 2018, LASYS Forum
Roberto Knoth

Talk (PDF)

Optical design of beam delivery systems for cw and pulsed lasers

Stuttgart, 5 June, 2018, LASYS Forum
Roberto Knoth

Talk (PDF)

Optatec 2018

Below you may find a list of conference talks. Expand each of the individual boxes for more details.

Fast Physical-Optics Modeling of Microscopy System with Structured Illumination

Frankfurt, 17 May, 2018, SPIE Optical System Design
Rui Shi

Talk (PDF)

Abstract

Recent advancements in microscopy techniques such as super-resolution imaging, multiphoton excitation, correlative microscopy, adaptive optics, image processing etc. opens up new possibilities towards imaging single live cells in deep tissue with high resolution. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM) is one of the fluorescence imaging techniques that can tackle this challenge. However, in the case of thick samples the SIM technique suffers from out-of-focus fluorescence background signal, which significantly reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). To overcome this obstacle, it has been suggested to use two-photon excitation in combination with spotlight structured illumination. For the analysis and optimization of this kind of high-NA microscopy system, a fully vectorial physical optics modelling is required that includes polarization, diffraction, aberration and interference effects.
In this work, we perform a fast-physical optics modelling in the context of field tracing. The Local Plane Interface Approximation (LPIA) algorithm, a free space propagation algorithm and the Fourier Modal Method (FMM) are all combined. We analyse the homogeneity of the spot-like illumination interference pattern at the focal plane, which should be accounted for in image processing. We find that various effects influence the homogeneity of the pattern, such as the aberration of the real lens system, diffraction of the plane wave by an aperture, the Gaussian illumination profile and inclination of the blazed grating, which causes the asymmetry of the intensity distribution at the -1 and +1 diffraction orders. We also optimize the structured illumination system to minimize the inhomogeneity. Finally, the parameters of the optimized system can be obtained to apply to the experimental system.

The concept of bidirectional operators and its application to the modeling of microstructures

Frankfurt, 17 May, 2018, SPIE Optical System Design
Frank Wyrowski

Talk (PDF)

Abstract

The well-established ray-tracing concept of Bidirectional Scattering Distribution Function (BSDF), used traditionally to model the scattering of rays at micro-structured surfaces, serves as the inspiration for what we have called “bidirectional”, or B, operators: a physical-optics generalization that refers not only to the modelling of surface scattering, but of any component in an optical system; the effect of said component on a general electromagnetic field is contained in the corresponding B operator; the S matrix concept in grating theory may be understood as a special case thereof. Any method to solve Maxwell’s equations in the component can generally be formulated in the form of a B operator. A non-sequential connection of the different B operators solving Maxwell’s equations in different regions of an optical system enables physical optics in the entire system. The use of specialized operator models provides a fast solution in various situations. Besides the introduction of the general concept of bidirectional operator, we consider in more detail a set of special B operators based on local assumptions. By their sequential or non-sequential connection, we obtain what we refer to as a split-step class of solvers. The different methods are demonstrated at different examples, including a non-paraxial diffractive beam splitter, micro- and diffractive lenses, and the modelling of scattering.

Fast propagation of electromagnetic fields in graded-index media

Frankfurt, 17 May, 2018, SPIE Optical System Design
Huiying Zhong

Talk (PDF)

Abstract

Graded-index (GRIN) media are widely used for different situations: some components are designed with GRIN modulation in mind, e.g. multi-mode fibres, optical lenses or acousto-optical modulators; on the other hand, there are other components where the refractive-index variation is undesired due to, e.g., stress or heating; and finally, some effects in nature are characterized by a GRIN variation, like turbulence in air, or biological tissue. Modelling electromagnetic field propagation in GRIN media is then of high importance for optical simulation and design. Based on the concept of fast physical optics, we develop a theory to efficiently propagate the field in GRIN media, including the effect of polarization cross-talk. Here we emphasize that the field is general, i.e., it can be either in its diffractive (focus region, for instance) or geometric zones (e.g., the far-field zone). This theory and the resulting algorithms include established propagation techniques as special cases, e.g. the paraxial and scalar split-step method.

Physical-optics modelling for optical components made of birefringent materials

Frankfurt, 17 May, 2018, SPIE Optical System Design
Site Zhang

Talk (PDF)

Abstract

In modern optics, a huge variety of components with specific purposes made from different materials are employed. Birefringent materials, due to their polarization- and direction-dependent optical properties, are often used for manipulating light in difference aspects. That makes an important group of optical components, including polarizers, waveplates, prisms and so on. To model such components with proper inclusion of the birefringent effects, we adhere to physical optics, which is governed by Maxwell’s equations. Especially, by analysis in the spatial frequency domain, the effect from birefringence can be clearly revealed and, based on that, we develop a fast numerical algorithm to model light propagation through such components. We will present simulation examples on complex polarization conversion in uniaxial crystals, focusing properties due to birefringence, field propagation through a Wollaston prism, and conical refraction in biaxial crystals. 

Semi-analytical Fourier transform and its application to physical-optics modelling

Frankfurt, 17 May, 2018, SPIE Optical System Design
Zongzhao Wang

Talk (PDF)

Abstract

The Fast Fourier transform (FFT) algorithm constitutes the backbone for fast physical optics modelling. The numerical effort of the FFT technique is approximately linear with the required number of sampling points of the complex amplitude of a field component. However, in optics we often deal with field components which possess a strong wavefront phase, whose complex sampling leads to a huge numerical effort even in the case of the FFT. We propose a way to handle the Fourier transform which does not require the sampling of second-order polynomial phase terms, but rather treats them analytically. We present the theory of the semi-analytical FFT alongside several examples to demonstrate the great potential of this approach.

The Gouy Phase Shift Reinterpreted Via the Geometric Fourier Transform

Frankfurt, 17 May, 2018, SPIE Optical Systems Design
Olga Baladron-Zoritaa

Talk (PDF)

Optical design of diffractive and freeform solutions for light shaping with VirtualLab Fusion

Frankfurt, 15 May, 2018, Optatec Forum
Frank Wyrowski

Talk (PDF)

OPIE 2018

Below you may find a list of conference talks. Expand each of the individual boxes for more details.

Non-Sequential Optical Modeling with VirtualLab Fusion

Tokyo, 25th of April, 2018, OPIE Exhibition Talk
Hartwig Crailsheim

Talk (PDF)

Abstract

VirtualLab Fusion—the known fast physical optics software—provides different approaches for non-sequential simulations through the entirety or part of an optical system. In non-sequential simulations with both ray and field tracing the user can control which light-propagation paths are to be considered. It is possible to switch between sequential and different degrees of non-sequential light (ray and field) tracing. At the same time, systems can be modeled conveniently and in a much more compact form. The investigation of etalons or ghost images generated by back-reflections is easily performed, so that countermeasures can be considered where necessary.
Non-sequential simulations require the accurate consideration of energy conservation. After all, it is of paramount importance to know how much energy the different deflected light portions carry. Otherwise no meaningful result can be expected. VirtualLab’s field tracing engine takes care of this by tracing the full electromagnetic field, considering polarization and coherence effects. VirtualLab provides different Maxell solvers, ranging from the approximated to the fully rigorous, which can be applied at will for different parts of the system: this results in an unparalleled versatility to adjust simulation time and accuracy to the specific needs of the user.
Considering the full capacity of VirtualLab by using also its grating and waveguide analysis tools, highly complex waveguide setups containing diverse grating structures can be modeled, analyzed and optimized. The evaluation of efficiencies of even subwavelength gratings is done rigorously. This way the analysis of grating components as parts of larger systems is made possible, a feat that would be impracticable if performed with universal Maxwell solvers for the whole system at once. 

SPIE Photonics Europe 2018

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